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Posts Tagged ‘paper doll’

This week I’m visiting with Little Red Riding Hood courtesy of Agence Eureka. If you are not familiar with that totally awesome blog you should click the link and check it out. It is emphera heaven!

chaperon2.0

chaperon1.0

This particular entry is a Toy Theatre. How cool is that?

chaperon3.0

And here is a diagram showing how to put it together. You’ll need some cardboard to make the box that serves as a surround, cereal or cracker boxes will work. Use a wire or a bamboo skewer as a handle for the figures. Or pipe cleaners or whatever else you have handy. Remember the important thing is to Have Some Fun!

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Thought I would continue the mod theme with this little gem.

Mod Missy by Whitman circa 1969. She’s quite the hipster. The box for my set is less than great; some of the paper is peeled off on the lid and the bottom of the box is dented in. However this doesn’t matter terribly much to me as the contents are mint. Uncut costumes and a perfect thick cardboard doll.

Incidently, Whitman must have really wanted to avoid any possible confusion about this being a Mod doll; they stuck the word mod every place they could wedge it in. As if one glance at the doll or her clothes could have left any doubt. Ha!

Even her posture is a bit hip. Adore that face and those perfect 60s shoes.

The costumes are fab; she plays the guitar. In addition to wonderfully evocative outfits she has great wigs, dig the Carnaby ensemble complete with boots and wig/hat.

Just in case you missed the point, the publisher even stuck yet another mention of mod in the title of the magazine — love that Beatles suit and wig! Make sure to click on the picture to check out the details of the pink dress in the lower left; nehru collar and ruffled cuffs are soooo precious.

Hope that the Friends of Blythe and other fashionistas have enjoyed this wardrobe inspiration post.

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oddfellows book cover

Yes, I finally got around to getting my very own copy of this entirely charming book. That’s right: Entirely Charming.

It’s a story (or stories) about orphans and their adventures that made me feel all together safe and cosy and warm. I’m talking “peanut butter and honey sandwich” cosy, “wrapped up in a quilt on the couch while a storm rages outside” safe and warm.

I want to go to cryptozoology class with Professor Silas. I want to ride on a bear at a picnic. I want to hang out and do homework with a hedgehog student who’s always hungry. I want to live in a place that has bear-drawn carriages.

bear-drawn carriage

When I was a little girl I had several favorite books that were illustrated by Tasha Tudor. The softness of her pencil drawings resonated with the stories and made them more real. Emily’s drawings echo that feeling.

delia

This is a book of perfect innocence.

It’s also a book of eclectic curriculums, unusual people (including an onion headed boy), rabbit shaped pancakes, honey and, oh yes, dearies . . . bears.

It has become apparent that I share more than a few common interests with Emily Martin. Her blog Inside a Black Apple is delightful and I’ve been reading it for rather a long while. She has a terribly good eye for things both vintage and modern that have a certain sensibility; a let’s get comfortable, enjoy a nice cup of tea and talk about lovely fun things sensibility. Well, lovely fun things that are just the teensiest bit off center, perhaps just an itty bit bent. Which likely explains why I keep doing blog posts about her (here and here).

She has a new website just for Oddfellow’s Orphanage which you can read about here. To celebrate, Emily has made a new paper doll and is giving it away free at the Oddfellows website (it’s in the Diversions section). Just like last time; personal use only please.

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You may remember that I wrote a post last year about the Black Apple Paper Doll Primer.

Now Emily Martin (aka Black Apple) has very generously made a new holiday paper doll and is giving it away for FREE! Personal use only please.

Is she great or what? If you haven’t already; go buy her book NOW!

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Evelyn Gathings Rocks!

I’m extremely fond of her particular approach to the art of the paper doll. She seems to specialize in animals which just makes me like them even more.

But the real reason I’m blogging about this paper doll set now is that the little baby sister doll reminds me so very, very much of the fire-setting cat in my last post (yes, the baked apple cat). Seriously, check out that little face. That little “I’m mayhem, go ahead turn your back on me” face. This is a face I’d love to see on a Connie Smith doll.

The costumes in this set are very fine; though they look more Edwardian than Victorian to my eye. Yeah, I’m one of those historical detail people to whom the distinction Victorian/Edwardian makes a difference. Overall the colors and details throughout the set are fantastic as are the plethora of accessories.

I especially love the commentary on the costume pages. It’s borderline snarky while retaining a warm sweet surface layer. Click to enlarge the images, read it for yourself. Enjoy!

 

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More fashion inspiration for Blythe fans and people who just like paper dolls. Missy Go Along is a fun, funky paper doll from 1970. There seem to be several variations on this set, with different hair styles/colors and a variety of different costumes but all with dolls in the same poses. I actually had a similar set of these dolls as a child — having this set in my collection is a real nostalgia trip.

Love that green coat worn with bright pink tights and grey boots. Quite Fab!

The dress pattern I used for the Blythe Birthday outfit would be perfect for the (white-pink-yellow) pseudo mondrian check dress. The fabric could be made fairly easily with applique or paint with ribbon or ric-rac borders. Now I just have to keep my eyes open for some jewelry components for use for the belt.

Even if you don’t have a Blythe (or other doll) who demands new clothes on a regular basis, it’s fun to look at the funky possibilities and know that once upon a time, not so very long ago, actual people were wearing clothes that looked like this.

This is why I love paper dolls. They can be a quite accurate record of what people were wearing. Fashion and costume history books are great for historic (long, long ago) clothes but for the twentieth century — not so much. I’m also very much into the whole packaging, graphic design element of the look of them. Which shouldn’t be a huge surprise as I’m an ex-graphic designer myself.

Plus they’re intensely fun, fun, fun and they don’t take up a whole lot of room which means they qualify as practical too (well . . sort of).

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Cheerful Daisy Paper Doll

Today being another in a succession of gloomy gray days I decided to post something bright and cheerful.

daisy pd cover

Daisy is from the late 1970s and is, as will become incredibly obvious, a Holly Hobbie clone. Well, not a clone exactly as Daisy (the doll) has her own rather distinctive look. But clone-ish in that she has that same prairie-style look to her wardrobe.

daisy paper doll

She’s really kind of sweet even with her rather oversize head. Actually I think her large noggin makes her especially sweet. Though it does make me wonder, how much of her head is hat and not head at all.

daisy paper doll clothes 1

Love the artist smock with the button-up sides.

Daisy paper doll clothes 2

There’s the very obvious Holly Hobbie patchwork pinafore over a blue dress.

daisy paper doll clothes 3

And a warm coat; it may be a gray day, but baby it’s cooold outside!

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